2015 GMC Sierra Elevation Edition Gets Sporty Looks

More stealth, less chrome. ...

More stealth, less chrome.

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Infiniti’s new BMW Series coupe rival is coming

Infiniti has confirmed to TopGear.com that in 2015 will unveil a two-door coupe to take on the BMW 4 Series. Shiro Nakamura, chief creative officer of Infiniti and senior VP of Nissan, told TG his plans to take on the BMW 4 Series. “I want to m...

Infiniti has confirmed to TopGear.com that in 2015 will unveil a two-door coupe to take on the BMW 4 Series. Shiro Nakamura, chief creative officer of Infiniti and senior VP of Nissan, told TG his plans to take on the BMW 4 Series. “I want to make a two-door coupe. It’s coming, you’ll see it within one year. It’ll be a production version, a little bit bigger than a BMW 4-Series, but not as big as a 6-Series,” he said.

Infiniti’s new BMW Series coupe rival is coming

Infiniti Q50 shown here “As you know, always our sizes are a little bit in between BMW’s sizes. Look at the Q50, that’s between the 3-Series and 5-Series,” he added. Furthermore, Shiro noted how the two-door coupe would take design elements and cues from the upcoming Paris Motor Show concept, the Q80. The shift in strategy comes after former Infiniti boss Johan de Nysschen only last year noted how he wanted the brand to remain exclusive, how “we don’t want an Infiniti on every single driveway”. READ ALSO: BMW Exec gets the Infiniti CEO job Shiro is looking in the other directions. “We need volume,” he says. “Otherwise you cannot invest. We’re hoping the Q30 will bring big volume, particularly from Europe and China, because it’s the most affordable Infiniti. Without volume you can’t do anything. This industry is so tough. “Aston Martin for example, can be niche because they’re expensive cars, but we cannot price ourselves any higher than Mercedes-Benz (on whose A-Class platform the new Q30 hatch sits),” Shiro added. The Infiniti Q80 will be launched next year and a halo performance based of it could follow as well. The article Infiniti’s new BMW Series coupe rival is coming appeared first on BMW BLOG

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A Guide to Understanding Carbon Fiber Weaves and Fabrics

Carbon fiber originated for aerospace use, but as it has become more usable this material expanded into the automotive industry.  It has several properties that make it a superior product for so many automotive applications.  Properties such as hi...

Carbon fiber originated for aerospace use, but as it has become more usable this material expanded into the automotive industry.  It has several properties that make it a superior product for so many automotive applications.  Properties such as high rigidity, tensile strength, chemical resistance,  temperature tolerance, and with a low weight and thermal expansion. Carbon Fiber is a material that consisted of thousands of carbon atom fibers in diameters of 5 to 10 micrometers.  In order for RW Carbon to produce carbon fiber products like front lip spoilers, rear diffusers, trunk spoilers, trunks, hood and many more, the carbon atom crystals must be bonded together in a symmetrical and parallel pattern.  This alignment gives the carbon fiber its strength and the ability to be lightweight.  Thousands to millions of these carbon fibers are bundled together to form carbon fabric. From there a mold must be made of the desired aero piece.  In order to form your favorite carbon fiber parts and accessories, resin must be added to the carbon fabric and then molded.  When a perfect mixture/ratio of carbon fabric and resin is used the parts become extremely rigid and take on a very high strength-to-weight-ratio. Strength- to-Weight-Ratio: Every carbon fiber aero part that is designed has its own special number of layers of fibers to create a perfect ratio of strength, weight and stiffness.  This is why carbon fiber is so limitless when it comes to the design aspect.  Metal on the other hand is more limited on the shape it can provide.  Carbon fiber composites typically weigh a quarter of the weight of steel, but has the same amount of rigidity, making it 4 times as stiff on a weight-to-weight basis. To many potential carbon fiber buyers, determining why a particular type of carbon fiber is used over another can be quite confusing. Lets first break down the different categories of Carbon Fiber Woven Fabrics. 1. 2×2 Twill Weave The 2×2 twill weave is by far the most common carbon fiber fabric used in the automotive industry. This fabric type follows a distinct diagonal pattern. When you think about a 2×2 carbon weave look at it as a pattern that goes over two intersecting warps and under two (hence why it is called 2×2). This makes the fabric more pliable and looser. That means it can be applied more easily because it can be stretched to curves and contours with fewer complications. However, this also means the applicator needs to handle the weave more carefully than a plain or 1×1 weave as it is simple to leave slight distortions in the weave.

A Guide to Understanding Carbon Fiber Weaves and Fabrics

2. Plain (1×1) Weave The plain or 1×1 weave is the second most used fabric type in the auto industry. As you would expect it is given its name (1×1) because it looks more like a checker board where the weave pattern goes up one and down one. Plain weave is then a tighter knit fabric and is easier to handle without making any distortions. On the down side the tighter weave makes it more difficult to drape the fabric over the mold; making this type a second favorite choice for most manufacturers.

A Guide to Understanding Carbon Fiber Weaves and Fabrics

RW Carbon offers both carbon fiber weaves in certain items we sell.  The majority of products only come in 2×2 twill weave but for our BMW M3 and M6 owners we offer 1×1 or 2×2 which give them the option to match their carbon fiber roof. Other or Less Common Weaves The majority of carbon fiber parts and accessories are made using these two types of weaves mentioned above. However, there are others out there such as: Satin weave, harness weave, fish weave and unidirectional. All of these are just different weave patterns for carbon fabric. In almost every automotive application 1×1 or 2×2 weave is superior in looks and construction which is why you rarely will hear these other weave types. Only custom or unusual carbon fiber requests will require weaves like these. Unidirectional weave is where almost every fiber is aligned in the same direction. This kind of weave is only held together by the occasional strand of either carbon or polyester running across the fibers at a 90 degree angle. This kind of carbon fiber is best used where all the force is aligned in one direction, such as in an archery bow and arrow. Unidirectional Carbon Weave

A Guide to Understanding Carbon Fiber Weaves and Fabrics

So which weave pattern makes for the strongest fabric? Contrary to popular belief, the 1×1 or plain weave is actually weaker then the 2×2 or a 4 harness satin weave (4×4). This is because as the carbon fibers are put under strain or tension, the fibers want to pull straight but cannot due to the repeat of the pattern. Each fiber is forced over and under one another. Therefore, that tension will eventually shear apart the fabric, leaving a 2×2 with more tensile strength than a plain weave. Now that you have an understanding of carbon fiber weave types, next is to discuss the major types of carbon fiber cloths. In the auto industry there are 2 popular types of cloth, wet and dry prepreg. 1. Wet Prepreg Cloth Wet pregreg cloth is the most popular method for carbon fiber Front Lip Spoilers, Rear Diffusers and Trunks because it tends to be easier to manufacturer.  All that is needed is a precisely measured amount of resin or epoxy that is then poured over the fabric, making the fabric “wet”.

A Guide to Understanding Carbon Fiber Weaves and Fabrics

2. Dry Prepreg Cloth The dry prepreg cloth or otherwise known as “Dry Carbon” is very similar to wet prepreg as they both utilize resin or epoxy to adhere the fabric. However, unlike the wet version, the epoxy used for this cloth type has dry properties and is impregnated into the cloth. This step guarantees there is no excess epoxy, which gives it that “Dry” appearance. However, it makes the cloth sticker when at room temperature, which requires further steps to complete. This is why dry carbon parts and accessories tend to be more expensive when compared to wet carbon cloth. Once the aero parts are molded it requires baking for several hours at a temperature of 250 degrees fahrenheit. This is because it will not cure in room temperature.

A Guide to Understanding Carbon Fiber Weaves and Fabrics

Why would I pay more for a Dry Carbon Aero Piece? The answer is quite simple.  Dry carbon is able to create the same tensile strength as wet carbon fiber but it weighs substantially less.  So for all your auto enthusiast looking to track your car and shed some weight, dry carbon is a must! If you have any further questions about carbon fiber weaves or fabric please email RW Carbon at info@rwcarbon.com The article A Guide to Understanding Carbon Fiber Weaves and Fabrics appeared first on BMW BLOG

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In pursuit of points in Zandvoort.

Marco Wittmann was crowned Drivers’ Champion at the Lausitzring, but there are still two titles up for grabs when the DTM season enters the finishing straight in Zandvoort next weekend. The title race is in full swing in both the Manufacturers...

Marco Wittmann was crowned Drivers’ Champion at the Lausitzring, but there are still two titles up for grabs when the DTM season enters the finishing straight in Zandvoort next weekend.

The title race is in full swing in both the Manufacturers’ and the Team competitions. With this in mind, the BMW Motorsport teams and drivers have their sights set on scoring as many points as possible at the “Circuit Park Zandvoort”, in order to defend the leads currently held by BMW Team RMG and BMW. Stefan Reinhold’s team, which includes the new DTM champion in Wittmann, currently tops the Team standings with 167 points. In the Manufacturers’ Championship, BMW leads with 320 points. Last season, the race in Zandvoort proved to be successful for BMW Motorsport. Wittmann, at the wheel of the Ice-Watch BMW M3 DTM, claimed the first pole position of his DTM career in qualifying. He then went on to clock the fastest lap during the race, setting a time of 1:32.296 minutes on his sixth lap of the 4.307-kilometre circuit in the Dutch sand dunes. The winner at the “Circuit Park” was fellow BMW driver Augusto Farfus. He produced an outstanding display in front of 41,000 spectators to clinch the 50th win in the history of the DTM for the BMW M3. Zandvoort is one of the BMW drivers’ favourite circuits. The reason for this is the characteristic of the circuit: the tricky hills, crests and bumps make a lap of the “Circuit Park” akin to a rollercoaster ride. The location, nestled in the dunes on the North Sea coast, is also unique. Zandvoort has stepped in to replace the race initially scheduled to take place in China, when the event originally planned for this weekend, in Guangzhou, had to be cancelled.

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2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray – Smitten with the Mitten

Exploring the great state of Michigan. ...

Exploring the great state of Michigan.

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Top 10 Cars with the Greatest Price Differentials

How much diversity can be contained within a single nameplate? ...

How much diversity can be contained within a single nameplate?

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Cleanly Modded BMW M6 Gran Coupe On Avantgarde Wheels

Some weeks ago, we wrote about a Sapphire Black BMW M6 with a full Vorsteiner kit and wheels, and today, we have the chance to show you another build, a cleanly modded BMW M6 Gran Coupe with a custom aero kit, wheels and an exhaust system. Considered...

Some weeks ago, we wrote about a Sapphire Black BMW M6 with a full Vorsteiner kit and wheels, and today, we have the chance to show you another build, a cleanly modded BMW M6 Gran Coupe with a custom aero kit, wheels and an exhaust system. Considered by many a fashion statement, ordering a 6 Series Gran Coupe is the way to go if you need the added usability of a four-door vehicle, while keeping in touch with design lines and performance of a Coupe vehicle.

Cleanly Modded BMW M6 Gran Coupe On Avantgarde Wheels

The BMW M6 Gran Coupe seen here is painted in the Space Gray Metallic finish and features the 4.4-liter BMW M TwinPower Turbo V-8, 32-valve 560-hp engine. The power unit combines an M TwinScroll turbocharger with variable valve control (Double-VANOS and Valvetronic) and high-precision direct injection. All of these adds up to a performance car that sprints from 0-62mph (0-100km/h) in 4.1 seconds, thanks to a 7-speed M Double Clutch Transmission (M DCT) with Drivelogic technology.

Cleanly Modded BMW M6 Gran Coupe On Avantgarde Wheels

To make the car stand out even more, a set of Avantgarde Wheels were fitted to the M6 Gran Coupe. These M510 wheels comes in 21×9 / 21×12.5 sizes, front and rear, respectively, and are painted with a gloss black finish. The car is nicely lowered to accompany the added size for the wheels and to provide a better stance and overall look.

Cleanly Modded BMW M6 Gran Coupe On Avantgarde Wheels

A complete aerodynamics body kit from ENLAES was installed as well. It features a front bumper, side skirts and a rear diffuser all made out of carbon fiber. This BMW M6 Gran Coupe also comes with a custom exhaust system. Please take a look at the media gallery right below.

Cleanly Modded BMW M6 Gran Coupe On Avantgarde Wheels

Cleanly Modded BMW M6 Gran Coupe On Avantgarde Wheels

The article Cleanly Modded BMW M6 Gran Coupe On Avantgarde Wheels appeared first on BMW BLOG

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2015 Subaru Outback Launches New TV Spots

Wagon or not, Outback lovers linger. ...

Wagon or not, Outback lovers linger.

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A Guide to Understanding Carbon Fiber Weaves and Fabrics

Here’s a nice guide to to understanding carbon fiber weaves and fabrics by RW Carbon. ...

Here’s a nice guide to to understanding carbon fiber weaves and fabrics by RW Carbon.

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BMW 850i Test Drive by Car and Driver

Car and Driver takes us back into the history of their magazine and the BMW brand. From their 1991 July issue resurfaces a review of the BMW 850i. Considered the flagship of the BMW brand at the time, the 8 Series was and remains of the most polarizi...

Car and Driver takes us back into the history of their magazine and the BMW brand. From their 1991 July issue resurfaces a review of the BMW 850i. Considered the flagship of the BMW brand at the time, the 8 Series was and remains of the most polarizing bummers one can see on the road. Prices on the used market continue to be quite high and the classic car turned collector item after initial struggles with the sales. Under the hood, the 850i was fitted with the 5 liter M70B50 V12 engine producing 300 PS (221 kW; 296 hp) and was available with either a 4-speed automatic or a 6-speed manual gearbox. Top speed was limited to 186 mph.

BMW 850i Test Drive by Car and Driver

The 850i included Automatic Stability Control (ASC), which limited power to the rear wheels when wheel slippage was detected during acceleration. The manual version came with a different feature: ASC + T; which also applied brakes to the rear wheels to restore traction. The 850i was the first model to use BMW’s new Seat-Integrated Belt system, which integrated the belt system into the seat instead of anchoring it to the floor and/or roof pillar. Between 1989 and 1992, there were 20,072 produced. Here is an excerpt from their review: With the 850i’s speed and silence comes annoyance, however. A sports-luxury machine as expensive as this should be as sweet as homemade marmalade to drive, even if you’re just on a run to the cleaners. But the 850i will have you talking to yourself every time you attempt to creep along in rush-hour traffic. No matter how gingerly you toe into the throttle, the engine lunges and snaps your head. Lunge-snap. Lunge-snap. It’s like having your mother shake you by the shoulders. Our experience with the 750iL, which also comes with an automatic, suggests that it is the 850i’s manual gearbox that elicits this spastic behavior. Apparently the automatic’s torque converter smooths the initial bump of acceleration. An 850i with an automatic is a happier car for other reasons as well. The six-speed overdrive gearbox in our test car never slotted into second gear without a shudder, and the clutch required a hefty push and a full extension of the left leg to get it all the way down. Running through the gears was more work than it was worth. You’d hope that a device for serious driving like the 850i would have sharp-as-a-knife road manners. Hell, BMW practically invented the sports sedan, so that shouldn’t be too pressing an order. But here, too, the 850i disappoints. It feels wide of beam and bulky. Its steering is loose and woozy. On anything but billiard-table-perfect pavement, it simply doesn’t know where straight-ahead is; it sniffs around like a bloodhound in search of a scent and requires constant minding just to keep it centered in the lane. Amazingly, the 850i even stumbles over the seams in the pavement when you change lanes. Full review here The article BMW 850i Test Drive by Car and Driver appeared first on BMW BLOG

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